8 responses

  1. ebohlman
    May 1, 2009

    The interesting thing about people who refuse to change their stereotypical judgments based on new evidence is that they often wind up losing huge amounts of money to con artists. That’s because a con artist’s MO is to make a really good first impression and then ask you to do something that you normally wouldn’t even consider. But if you’ve already pegged him as a Good Person and you’re unwilling/unable to change that judgment, then you’ll come up with all sorts of wild rationalizations why you should do what he’s asking.

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  2. Sandy
    May 1, 2009

    People make similar assumptions about me, especially because I’m a girl. And girls are *never* autistic, right? I hate that the more NT the person I’m talking to (and/or the more stressful the situation), the more my traits start coming out. Whereas I can hide it otherwise.

    But because I look typical and can mimic expressions and intonations, people assume that the social mistakes I make are intentional attempts to hurt them. It must be because I’m a woman? There are so many sides to autism that people just don’t know about. Like you, I wish we could do something about this.

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  3. Gonzo
    May 2, 2009

    I really love this post!

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  4. Adrian
    May 2, 2009

    I just don’t know what to do about some people’s tendency to make quick assumptions other than trying to provide gentle education. This goes outside the realm of disabilities to the realm of abilities where some people assume others are lazy just because they haven’t achieved the things they have — it’s an assumption that everyone has limitless physical and mental energy if they choose to use it.

    Sometimes people automatically assume a young, healthy-looking person is abusing someone’s handicapped parking pass. The truth might be that the young person has a heart condition or maybe has a temporary condition from an injury or surgery.

    Assumptions are made about little things, too. Some people wonder why someone as young as me uses reading glasses. It’s true I don’t have presbyopia, so I can focus my eyes on something close while wearing my contact lenses, but I have accommodative delay which makes it difficult and could impair my distance vision.

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  5. Montana
    May 2, 2009

    I take interest in people’s personal opinions regarding this disorder, and I have to agree with every word in this blog post.

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  6. NTE
    May 2, 2009

    Over and over again, during this year’s BADD, I keep coming across the fact that an important part of disabilism is the fact that people feel entitled to completely disregard the experiences of people with disabilities. So a key part of overcoming disabilism then, would be that temporarily able bodied people would recognize that a person with a disability’s experience – of their illness, of the world around them, of the way they are being treated – is valid, regardless of whether or not it matches up to their own. (Ah, the joys of privilege).

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  7. Marie Brant
    January 28, 2010

    This hits home to me! My step son is HFA. Never having known anyone on the spectrum before, it was hard for me, at first, when he had difficulties, or an “off day” because he presents so neurotypical most of the time. I have learned a lot in the last few years about autism and continue to learn. Thanks for this blog and for all the good links.

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